Berkeley Conversations: Reopening and reimagining after COVID-19

Live webcast: Monday, Oct 12 4–5:30 p.m. (Pacific)

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This event will be broadcast live on this page. You can also watch this event live on the UC Berkeley Facebook page.

You can submit questions to the panel in advance.

What measures can be put into place to make sure it’s safe for all Americans to get back to school, work, and public spaces? Will there really be a vaccine ready by November? When there is a vaccine, who’ll get it first and how long will it take to achieve herd immunity? How can cutting-edge tools like machine learning and artificial intelligence be used to speed the discovery of new drugs? What will it take to create a global early warning system that allows early curtailment of the next pandemic?

As part of the Berkeley Conversations: COVID-19 series of live webcasts, Berkeley School of Public Health Dean Michael C. Lu will moderate a panel of experts in epidemiology, infectious diseases, vaccinology, biostatistics, and genome research to answer the questions on all of our minds about how we can re-open safely and reimagine how we will tackle future pandemics.

Panelists:

Michael Marletta, PhD, UC Berkeley College of Chemistry professor of chemistry and molecular and cell biology and CH and Annie Li Chair in the Molecular Biology of Diseases

Maya Petersen, MD, PhD, UC Berkeley School of Public Health associate professor of epidemiology and biostatistics and chair of the Division of Biostatistics

Arthur Reingold, MD, UC Berkeley School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and chair of the Division of Epidemiology

John Swartzberg, MD, FACP, UC Berkeley School of Public Health clinical professor emeritus, Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology

Fyodor Urnov, PhD, UC Berkeley professor of molecular and cell biology, scientific director of technology and translation at the Innovative Genomics Institute

Moderator: UC Berkeley School of Public Health Dean Michael C. Lu, MD, MS, MPH

This event is sponsored by the School of Public Health.